Premature Ejaculation SSRI Antidepressants

Premature ejaculation (PE) is a major problem for men around the world. The fact is that almost one out of three men in all age groups suffers from premature ejaculation. That means whether you're 21 or 81, you are likely to have a 30% chance of having PE.

One would think that with such a widespread problem, drug companies would come up with a simple solution, much like Viagra. However, while Viagra has been very effective at curing and coping with erectile dysfunction, there is no little blue pill that can cure premature ejaculation.

Thankfully, there are a number of possible coping methods for premature ejaculation, including a prescription for antidepressants that are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs. Such medications include popular drug brand names like Prozac, Zoloft, or Paxil.

While these medications have been FDA approved to treat depression, they have not been FDA approved for treating premature ejaculation. Despite this fact, many physicians will prescribe SSRI antidepressant medication for their patients with premature ejaculation, as SSRIs have a potential side effect of delaying orgasm in men. This is why antidepressants may be able to treat and help men with premature ejaculation by effectively delaying the male climax and ejaculation.

How is SSRI Treatment Taken?

If an anti-depression medication is prescribed for patients with premature ejaculation, it must be administered orally on a regular daily basis. The constant intake of the SSRI medication will produce the desired effect within the body. Usually it takes about two weeks to determine if a certain dosage is effective. If not, a doctor may increase the dosage of SSRI to an effective level.

Other Possible Side Effects

Taking an SSRI antidepressant may help a man cope with premature ejaculation and effectively allow him to enjoy longer-lasting sex. However, the drug can have other negative and unwanted side effects as well. These potential side effects will be explained by one's physician before prescribing the medication, but they include:

  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Dry mouth
  • Weight gain
  • Reduced libido (This side effect negates the purpose of solving premature ejaculation)
  • Inability to sustain an erection
  • Inability to orgasm, or anorgasmia
  • Drowsiness
  • Sleeplessness
  • Strange or vivid dreams
  • Thoughts of suicide

SSRI Treatment for Premature Ejaculation on the Horizon

While there is not FDA-approved use for an SSRI treatment to cope with premature ejaculation, there is work being done to get one approved. Since 2006, medical professionals have been studying the effects of dapoxetine, which is an SSRI drug that can be used by those who suffer from premature ejaculation only on the days they expect to engage in sexual activity. This releases the requirement of taking an SSRI each day. Once the effect of dapoxetine is done, it is simply flushed from the body.

Dapoxetine has already been approved for use against premature ejaculation in Great Britain in the spring of 2010. And while there are still FDA questions regarding the safety and effectiveness of dapoxetine use, it is likely that it will be an approved treatment some time in the future.